Answered By: Paige Mann
Last Updated: Nov 10, 2017     Views: 2

When you find material with a Creative Commons license that you'd like to use in your own work, be sure you properly credit the source. Think about the questions this might raise such as:

  • Who created the work?
  • What is it work called?
  • Where did you get it from?
  • Why does it look different from the original?
  • How do you know you have the right to use it the way you did in your own work?

 

  Example 1

"Pallas cat looking angry" by Tambako The Jaguar

"Pallas cat looking angry" by Tambako The Jaguar, licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

This is a good attribution because I answered the questions above, and provided links where I could to help people find the image, the creator's profile, and information on the license used. Since the "ND" or "no derivatives" part of the license prevented me from significantly modifying the work, I didn't include language about how I modified it from the original. 

 

Example 2

orange and black adult cat snuggled into a ball on a bed

Higher saturation of color in "Penny snuggles" by Michaelrstern under a CC BY 3.0 license.

 

This is a good attribution because I answered the questions above, and provided links where I could to help people find the image, the creator's profile, and information on the license used. I also specified the way that I slightly modified the material.

 

Example 3

black and white image of a cat napping in a tight ball.

"Almost looks like a pencil drawing of Penny" by Paige Mann, CC BY 4.0 is a derivative of "Penny snuggles" by Michaelrstern under a CC BY 3.0 license.

 

This is a good attribution because I answered the questions above, and provided links where I could to help people find the image, the creator's profile, and information on the license used. Since I had permission to make significant changes to the material, I noted that I derived a new work from an original work and assigned a license to the work I created.

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